Language:  GlossaryImagesHelp
 
Home: ABOUT: Coasts and Coral Reefs
Advanced Search | an expanded view of Topics and Knowledge in the Atlas
 Login for Members

 Username
 
 Password
 

Forgotten your Password?

Not a Member? Join Now

 
Navigate the Atlas:
 9 SUB-TOPICS:
 Topic Overview
 Editors
 
Coasts and Coral Reefs Maintained by FAO-FI  
Text-only     Printer-friendly version             
Home for Two-Thirds of World Population
 
The sea can have such a powerful influence on coastal communities that local people may know more about the immediate seabed offshore than the land that ranges behind them. ".. Whereas I can name a hundred or more subsea features around Fogo Island", says Newfoundlander Leslie Harris, "I cannot name more than ten hills or prominent features of the interior".

About 60 percent of the world population lives within 60 kilometres of the coast. According to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), this proportion will rise to 75 percent within two decades. The continental shelf is where over 80 percent of all ocean resources are concentrated. Of the world's 23 mega-cities (those with over 2.5 million inhabitants), 16 are in the coastal belt and are growing at a rate of about one million people per day. These cities almost always grew up because of a sheltered harbour for ships seeking trade, searching for resources, or providing a "relief valve for overpopulation." Coastal cities often provide access to and from the interior through a major river system, and to plentiful sources of animal protein in the seas. Nowadays, the coasts are a powerful magnet for tourism, the world's top growth industry. (Text courtesy of UNESCO)   See More...
Photo credit: NOAA
 
Sea Level Rise
 
If global temperature continues to increase, scientists predict a parallel rise in sea level. This is partly due to an increased rate of melting of polar ice-caps, partly to the fact that water expands as it warms - and so sea level goes up. The critical question is by how much?

Ever since the end of the last ice age, the sea has been rising, some 1-2 mm per year in the last century or so. Some times it has been much faster as thick ice has slid off land into the sea. Even at the the current rate, there is constant pressure on coral reefs to keep pace and nesting beaches continue to get narrower, wherever they are not taken away completely by human activities. (Text courtesy of UNESCO)   See More...
Photo credit: NOAA
 
 
 
 
All  (49) News   (13) Events   (3) Websites   (14) Documents   (8) Books   (8) Multimedia   (3)
 All
 
News
Events
Websites
Progress in restoring the Klamath River Basin, Oregon and California (USA) and its historic salmonid fisheries.  A cooperative effort between native Americans, commercial and recreational fishers. Activities in the Klamath River Basin Progress in restoring the Klamath River Basin, Oregon and California (USA) and ...  
Information on U.S. estuaries (Now merged with Oceana) American Oceans Campaign Information on U.S. estuaries (Now merged with Oceana) 
CEFAS is an internationally renowned scientific research and advisory centre working in fisheries management, environmental protection and aquaculture. CEFAS - The UK Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science CEFAS is an internationally renowned scientific research and advisory centre wo...  
An overview of Climate Change and the Great Barrier Reef Climate Change and the Great Barrier Reef An overview of Climate Change and the Great Barrier Reef 
  1  2  3  Next » 
976 Topics - 5635 Related Knowledge - 11431 Members - 47 Editors
freeMem:137,623,840 totMem:428,670,976 reqNum:590632 openSessions:0 generationTime:2014/08/27 20:55:39