Power and energy supply

Modern living is fuelled by electricity. This electricity is expensive both in terms of money and natural resources.

The split of energy resources in 1999:

    Coal 34%
    Nuclear power 17%
    Natural gas 19%
    Renewables 20%
    Oil 10%
    Populations increase and with them the demand for electricity. In future times non-renewable sources of power such as, gas, oil, and coal, are widely proclaimed to run out. At that time the worlds energy sources need to have shifted to rely on renewable sources such as wind, solar, hydro-power, wave and tidal energy, and geothermal power.

    The proposed wind power park at Cape Bridgewater, west of Portland, in southern Australia is an example of a practical renewable energy source. However it will create a string of turbines along dunes by the coast, between an internationally recognised wetland used by migratory birds and the endangered orange-bellied parrot. Conservationists are concerned for the bird species and dune ecosystem and locals are worried that these turbines will spoil what is now a spectacular skyline. But there will be increasing demand for electricity over the coming decade, and wind power is one of the better alternatives when considering sustainable versus non-renewable energy sources.

    The trade off between the natural environment and the need for power sources has been occurring for decades and with world energy consumption projected to rise by 59% between 1999 and 2020, reaching 607 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) at the end of 2020, there shall be more conflicts of this kind in future decades too.

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